MRes Classical Studies

MA Classical Studies

The MRes Classical Studies concentrates on the literature and culture of the Greco-Roman world. The programme is divided into a 60 credit taught part and a Dissertation of 120 credits amounting to up to 30,000 words in total.

Key Facts

Institution Code: T80
Course Length:
2 years full-time; 4 years part-time

Location:
Lampeter
School/Faculty:
Faculty of Humanities and Performing Arts
Contact Email:
fhpadmissions@uwtsd.ac.uk
Language Choice
English  



An MRes in Classical Studies gives you the opportunity to study a range of modules on classical literature, and aspects of everyday life in the ancient world. Students study what amounts to 3 taught modules chosen from the collection of modules on the programme, with a requirement that one of the choices be a Research Methods module. The dissertation of between 25000 to 30000 words forms the heart of this programme and allows the student to investigate in depth a topic or area of particular interest to them.

Students will choose three modules. Below is an illustrative list of modules available:

  • Women in Ancient Myth
  • Medicine in the Ancient World
  • Erotic Poetry in the Ancient World
  • Stories, Histories, and Ticket-Sales: Greeks and Romans on the Silver Screen
  • Myth in Epic

The MRes in Classical Studies will have a special appeal to those students who wish to study the ancient world with a focus on language and literature, and the interpretation of ancient texts. Providing our students with a range of learning opportunities and excellent teaching is the primary aim of the School of Classics.

All our modules, including our Dissertation supervision,  are delivered by specialists and active researchers. The influence of our research on our teaching offers our students the opportunity to learn from the best in the subject and follow the latest scholarly trends and discoveries.

Our programme is designed to help learners both on campus and at a distance. Our Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) is a live forum through which students and staff can interact, through which students are able better to revise and explore difficult topics and through which students are better able to access the electronic resources available in the virtual world.

Studying Classical Studies with us here at Trinity Saint David means research-led teaching and research-active learning in an environment that allows for both full use of the virtual world and the personal approach of expert tuition.

An MRes degree in Classical Studies involves a wide range of assessment methods. This variety of assessment helps develop skills in presenting material in clear, professional and a lucid manner, whether orally or in writing. In addition to traditional essays, you will be assessed through bibliographic exercises, presentations – oral and powerpoint based, creation of abstracts, in-house conference papers, article reviews, creation of project plans and, of course, the dissertation. The Dissertation is between 25,000 and 30,000 words.

The traditional requirement for entry onto a Level 7 programme is a 2.1 or 1st class undergraduate degree. In addition, the School encourages students with an equivalent and appropriate professional qualification or significant and relevant professional experience to apply.

Applicants are required to discuss their proposed research with the School before application, and the proposed research must be in one of the areas of supervision offered by the School of Classics.

The programme provides a broad foundation for postgraduate work, by laying particular stress on the methodologies and research tools needed for independent advanced study, thus acting as training for students who intend to undertake an MPhil or PhD.

The course also provides a professional qualification for teachers or others seeking Continuing Professional Development.

Residential Study

Students can study for any of our degrees residentially on the Lampeter campus. Classes take place between Monday and Friday during the teaching semesters. On average, a full-time student is expected to attend eight hours of classes every week. All non-linguistic classes are very small, usually not more than 5 students, while language class sizes depend on the level of study, hence beginners’ languages often attract some 15 students, while advanced languages have an average class-size of 5 students.

Distance Learning

All our degrees are available to distance learners, and indeed the greater part of our postgraduate cohort is comprised of distance learners. Every student has access to all module materials, including reading lists, on the Virtual Learning Environment (Moodle). All modules are taught by our lecturers, and are designed to be accessible and friendly to learning at a distance. Many of the modules are delivered in a blended fashion with use of video and audio presentations by the lecturers on each individual topic.

The assessment is on the student’s own subject of choice in relation to each module, always in consultation with the relevant tutor. Most modules are assessed by long essays, but some modules are assessed by alternative means, such as conference-style presentations. It is essential that distance learners have a good internet access, as well as use of computer facilities; the university offers all distance students individual support in accessing material from home. The Trinity Saint David Learning Resources Centre provides access to a variety of electronic academic material to distance learners, including more than 1000 Classics e-books, 70 Classics e-journals, and a number of specialised Classics e-resources.