Current CBM funded PhD research projects

Finite Element Analysis for the validation of next-generation additive-manufactured products

Many companies, especially SMEs, are engaged in the production of small batches of products.  New advanced manufacturing techniques, allied to new materials, offer significant opportunities to reduce the cost of such small batch manufacture through adopting new approaches to processes such as tooling, shaping and forming.  The success of these new approaches will depend on evaluating new materials to determine their suitability as a basis for these processes, and then identifying the constraints under which they can be successfully employed.  Techniques such as Finite Element and Boundary Element Analysis will be crucial in this research.

Design optimisation of medical products using 3D scanning technology

Significant attention has been paid to the modelling, design and development of implants, for example, to support cranial reconstruction. There has been less of a focus on the modelling and design of orthoses. The ability to accurately model the behaviour of such products when fabricated in a variety of materials and by a variety of manufacturing processes could potentially bring a step change in the effectiveness (and cost-benefit) of these products.

Application of Advanced Manufacturing Technologies to the craft sector

Recent developments in technology and materials have the capacity to create very significant new opportunities for companies engaged in the low volume manufacture of products in the craft sector. A great majority of these companies still rely to a very large extent on design, prototyping and manufacturing processes which have changed little in the last two centuries.  The advent of new fabrication technologies, allied to the development of new materials provide major opportunities which can transform the economic performance of these companies.

Development of Electron Beam Melting technology for safety-critical aerospace components

3D printing for the prototyping of aerospace parts is a long-established practice within the aerospace industry, but only in recent years has the technology made its way into the production of end-use parts, with associated benefits for flexibility and costs. The use of Electron Beam Melting (EBM) allows the production of metal products, specifically titanium, which exhibit superior properties to traditional cast metal products. This project will explore the wider commercial application of layer additive manufacturing, and specifically EBM, to the aerospace industry.

Evaluation of advanced materials for additive-manufactured medical implants

Significant attention has been paid to the modelling, design and development of implants, for example, to support cranial reconstruction.  The ability to accurately model the behaviour of medical products when fabricated in a variety of materials, including titanium, and by a variety of manufacturing processes, could potentially bring a step change in the effectiveness and cost-benefit of these products. This project will explore the application of advanced materials and technologies to the design, modelling and manufacture of medical implants.

For general enquiries, please email:
Dr Neil Strevett
Neil.Strevett@wales.ac.uk
TEL: 02920 375053/ 07534 228760