Dr Sean Jenkins

Dr Sean Jenkins' key research interest is the application of Infrared Thermography to the study of user experience during human-product interaction.

sean jenkins work
Sean's PhD and published research has established that psychological activity during different levels of product interaction evokes autonomic physiological responses, which are manifest in the vasodynamics of the human forehead and observable as temperature changes that can be captured and analysed using thermal imaging. 

Sean's work demonstrates that Infrared Thermography offers a viable non-contact objective measurement technique that may be used as a research tool to understand and predict user experiences during product interaction.

Sean's experimental work has successfully used triangulation between thermal imaging, frontal Electroencephalogram (EEG) and subjective measures to identify and measure tonic and phasic cognitive and affective states during simulated human-product interaction. 

The findings suggest that specific ‘types’ within a sample population may be identified using the differentia of forehead temperature asymmetry, which was shown to be associated with underlying asymmetry in frontal EEG activity, a recognised marker of affective traits and states. 

This imaging modality has potential applications within the field of user experience and product design, and is also applicable to other research fields including Psychophysiology, Psychology and Healthcare.

In addition to this, Sean's academic and professional research interests include all facets of Product Design (Theory and Practice) with specific teaching and research specialism in Computer Aided Design (2D Sketching to 3D Surface Modelling, Visualisation and Prototyping) and Human Factors (Product Interaction and User Experience).

Tel: +44 (0)1792 481119
E-mail: sean.jenkins@uwtsd.ac.uk

Full academic profile

Journal Article

Jenkins, S. D., Brown, R. D., & Rutterford, N. (2009). Comparing Thermographic, EEG and subjective measures of affective experience during simulated product interactions. International Journal of Design, 3 (2), 53-65.

Conference Proceedings:

Jenkins, S. D. & Brown, R. D. H. (2014). A correlational analysis of human cognitive activity using Infrared Thermography of the supraorbital region, frontal EEG and self-report of core affective state. 12th Quantitative InfraRed Thermography Conference, QIRT 2014, July 7-11, 2014, Bordeaux: Mechanics & Engineering Institute of Bordeaux.

Jenkins, S., Brown, R., & Rutterford, N. (2008). Comparison of Thermographic, EEG and subjective measures of affective experience of designed stimuli. 6th Design & Emotion: Dare to Desire. Hong Kong: Hong Kong Polytechnic University.

Jenkins, S. D., Brown, R. D., & Donne, K. E. (2007). Infrared thermography in design research; the application of thermal imaging as a measurement tool in the design process. Cumulus Working Papers: Schwäbisch Gmünd, Germany. 18/07, pp. 41-47. Helsinki: University of Art & Design.

Dr Jenkins has commercial experience as a freelance designer/maker, in the product, furniture and interior sectors, and as part of the University’s commercial services developing industrial and medical laser systems for international clients.  He has extensive experience of external student project liaison with a range of industrial clients, most recently working on live projects with RECARO Aircraft Seating GmbH, Hasbro and Cyden Ltd.

Currently exploring opportunities for the application of 3D CAD and 3D printing in the development and production of ceramic products with colleagues across the School of Design & Applied Arts and CIRIC.