Dr Roderick Bale PhD; BA

  • Technician
  • part time lecturer
  • research assistant
Lampeter

Tel: +44 (0) 1570424760
E-mail: r.j.bale@tsd.ac.uk

silhouette

  • Day to day running of laboratories
  • undertaking contract work for UWLAS
  • occasional teaching

The main part of my PhD research (Swansea) involved analysis and interpretation of annually resolved stable isotope ratios from seven individual bristlecone pine trees cellulose covering the last millennium. Following my PhD .

I worked as an Isotope dendrochronology research technician on the EU funded ‘Millennium’ project looking at European climate of the last 1000 years. In particular I was involved in developing a Slovenian larch ring width chronology and a 550 year stable isotope chronology from the same trees.

I have fourteen years work experience of field and laboratory archaeology, including experience of environmental sampling techniques, and have undertaken paid work involving various aspects of dendrochronology/archaeological wood (including dating living trees, remnant and waterlogged wood, historic buildings).

In my present role as research assistant for the departments archaeological consultancy (UWLAS) I am involved in dendrochronological dating of wood (living trees, buildings and waterlogged wood), analysis of archaeological wood assemblages, geophysical survey, field sampling for environmental archaeology, preparation of sediment samples for pollen analysis, sieving, selecting samples for 14C dating and data analysis.

As part time laboratory technician I am responsible for the day to day running of an active multi disciplinary environmental archaeology laboratory.

  • Advanced palaeo environmental methods (Masters level)
  • Palaeoenvironmental archaeology (undergraduate)
  • Dendrochronology and its application to archaeology.
  • Forest/ woodland ecology and history.
  • Dendroclimatology and other high resolution records of climate.
  • Climate reconstruction.
  • Holocene environmental change.
  • Human adaptation to environmental change.

Dendrochronology, Dendroclimatology.

Post -doctoral researcher (2011-2012) involved with Offshore Renewable Energy Impact Network (OREIN). Welsh government funded knowledge exchange project.

Contract work for UWLAS.

2013. Polona Hafner, Danny McCarroll, Iain Robertson, Neil J. Loader, Mary Gagen, Giles HF Young, Roderick J. Bale, Eloni Sonninen, Tom Levanič. ‘A 520 year record of summer sunshine for the eastern European Alps based on stable carbon isotopes in larch tree rings’. Climate Dynamics. July 2013 10.1007/s00382-013-1864-z

2012 Young, G.H.F., Bale, R.J., Loader, N.J., Mccarroll, D., Nayling, N. & Vousden, N. 2012, "Central England temperature since AD 1850: the potential of stable carbon isotopes in British oak trees to reconstruct past summer temperatures", Journal of Quaternary Science, , pp. n/a-n/a.DOI 10.1002/jqs.2554.  Web:   http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jqs.2554

2011 Hafner, P., I.Robertson, D.McCarrol, N.J. Loader, M.Gagen, R.J. Bale, H.Jungner, E.Sonninen, E.Hilasvuori, T.Levanic. 'Climate signals in the ring widths and stable carbon, hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of Larix decidua growing at the forest limit in the southeastern European Alps'. Trees - Structure and Function DOI 10.1007/s00468-011-0589-z

2011 Bale, R.J., I. Robertson, M.W. Salzer, N.J. Loader, S.W. Leavitt, M. Gagen, T.P. Harlan, and D. McCarroll. 2011. 'An annually resolved bristlecone pine carbon isotope chronology for the last millennium.' Quaternary Research, Vol. 76, Issue 1, pp 22-29, July 2011. doi:10.1016/j.yqres.2011.05.004

2010 Robertson, I, Levanic, T, Hafner, P, Gagen, M, Bale, R.J, Loader, N.J, Hilasvuori, E, Sonninen, E, Jungner, H and McCarroll, D. ‘Climatic reconstruction from larch in Slovenia’. Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 12. EGU general assembly.

2010 Bale, R.J., Robertson, I., Leavitt, S.W, Loader, N.J., Harlan, T.P., Gagen, M., Young, G.H.F., Csank, A., Froyd, C., McCarroll, D. ‘Temporal stability in bristlecone pine tree-ring stable oxygen isotope chronologies over the last two centuries’. The Holocene, 20, 1.