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Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) (MA)

The Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) (MA) equips students with the knowledge and skills required to teach English language to learners of different age groups and educational needs. The course is designed for home or international students who wish to pursue a career in teaching English to non-native speakers of English.

The aim of the programme is to train self-reflective language teaching professionals with a solid foundation in research skills, applied linguistics, second language acquisition and language teaching pedagogy.

The programme’s emphasis on applied research skills offers successful graduates progression opportunities into further research at doctoral level.

All international students on this programme must demonstrate that they fulfil the English language requirements of the University for study at Master’s level: An overall English Language level equivalent to an IELTS score of 6.0 (or equivalent) with no element lower than 5.5 in reading writing, listening and speaking.

PATHWAY OPTIONS AND HOW TO APPLY

Pathway Options and How to Apply

How to apply

Visit the University's apply section to find out more.


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Tuition Fees 2020/21:
£7,500 (Home/EU)
£13,340 (Overseas)
  • Research-led teaching focused on employability and practical application
  • Developed research environment in Institute of Education and Humanities
  • Possibility of progression onto Professional Doctorate in English Language Education and English Literature for successful graduates
  • Mix of teaching styles, ranging from more formal lectures and whole-group study to small discussion groups, seminars, one-to-one tutorials
  • Excellent career support

What you will learn

Course Overview

Students on this programme complete four compulsory 30 credit modules covering research methods, key issues in linguistics, theories of second language acquisition and English language teacher education. These taught modules form Part 1 (120 credits) of the degree. In Part 2 (60 credits) students will write a research dissertation under the supervision of an experienced, research-active academic.

The programme is delivered over the period of three semesters (October to September) without a break and can thus be completed within one year (12 months). The delivery schedule is as follows:

PART 1 (Taught Modules; 120 credits)

Semester 1 (October – January): Students complete two compulsory 30-credit modules

  • HPEN7002 Methods and Approaches in the Study of Language and Literature
  • HPEN7004 Key Issues in Linguistics

Semester 2 (February – May): Students complete a further two compulsory 30-credit modules

  • HPEN7005 English Language Teacher Education
  • HPEN7006 Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition

PART 2 (Research Dissertation; 60 credits)

Semester 3 (May – 30th September): Student work 4-5 months on their independent Research Dissertation (15,000 words) under the guidance of an experienced academic supervisor.

Students who wish to take more time to complete the programme can do so. Full-time students have up to 2 years to complete the course, part-time students up to 4 years.


Teaching on Part One of the programme will follow the type and range of methods and approaches undertaken at postgraduate level and be a mix of styles, ranging from more formal lectures and whole-group study to small discussion groups, seminars, one-to-one tutorials. The programme will also benefit from various workshops and research seminar series that will operate alongside the delivery of the modules and will draw together students from across the programme (indeed where appropriate from across the campus).

The Institute of Education and Humanities is at the centre of an extensive network of schools and colleges and thus provides an excellent environment for research into language teaching.

As part of the module English Language Teacher Education (HPEN7005) students will have the opportunity to complete a placement in a school, college or within the University to gain first-hand experience in applying what they have learned to the English language classroom.

Our research-active teaching staff supports a wide range of research themes and methodological approaches, including classroom-based action research, bi- and multi-lingualism, language development in early childhood education, translation studies, intercultural communication and language politics.

The course is suitable for English language teachers already in employment who wish to gain a qualification at Master’s level or prepare for a doctorate in Education or Second Language Acquisition.

Module Topics

Students on this programme complete four compulsory 30 credit modules covering research methods, key issues in linguistics, theories of second language acquisition and English language teacher education.

These taught modules form Part 1 (120 credits) of the degree.

In Part 2 (60 credits) students will write a research dissertation under the supervision of an experienced, research-active academic.

Teaching on Part One of the programme will follow the type and range of methods and approaches undertaken at postgraduate level and be a mix of styles, ranging from more formal lectures and whole-group study to small discussion groups, seminars, one-to-one tutorials. The programme will also benefit from various workshops and research seminar series that will operate alongside the delivery of the modules and will draw together students from across the programme (indeed where appropriate from across the campus).

The Institute of Education and Humanities is at the centre of an extensive network of schools and colleges and thus provides an excellent environment for research into language teaching.

As part of the module English Language Teacher Education (HPEN7005) students will have the opportunity to complete a placement in a school, college or within the University to gain first-hand experience in applying what they have learned to the English language classroom.

Our research-active teaching staff supports a wide range of research themes and methodological approaches, including classroom-based action research, bi- and multi-lingualism, language development in early childhood education, translation studies, intercultural communication and language politics.

The course is suitable for English language teachers already in employment who wish to gain a qualification at Master’s level or prepare for a doctorate in Education or Second Language Acquisition.


HPEN7002 Methods and Approaches in the Study of Language and Literature aims to equip you with the necessary foundations, skills and tools to undertake research in the areas of language teaching and literature.


HPEN7004 Key Issues in Linguistics aims to lay a solid theoretical and empirical linguistic foundation, enabling you to review and apply linguistic research to issues related to English language teaching.


HPEN7005 English Language Teacher Education provides postgraduate-level training for students who wish to learn about the theoretical, practical, and teaching aspects of teaching English, including curriculum design, lesson planning, teacher cognition and the classroom as a social context. Embedded in this module is an optional, 2-4 weeks long placement component.


HPEN7006 Current Theories of Second Language Acquisition examines how a second language is learned, and the cognitive, social and cultural processes involved.


HPEN7023 MA Dissertation (TESOL) You will apply your knowledge and skill to a clearly defined research project at Level 7.


Assessment

The programmes assessment strategy consists of formative and summative assessments. Formative assessments aim to use the form of ‘spiral assessment’, encouraging students to revisit and implement standards that have been covered in previous modules. Likewise, self-reflexivity as a professional attitude that is expected of each graduate of this programme will be embedded and practiced though specific assignments in all modules.

Typical assessment formats include essays, oral presentations, critical reviews, teaching demos, and other short written assignments.

Module assessment is designed to prepare students for the task of submitting an MA dissertation in Part 2. Some modules therefore use a standard assessment pattern consisting of one or two longer essays and a presentation. In some modules, however, student progress is assessed by using the portfolio format. The portfolio offers greater flexibility in the assessment of professionally focused skills, both collaborative and personalised, than the standard essay/presentation format.

Key Information

Staff
Entry Criteria

Applicants are expected to have a good first degree (a first or upper second), although every application is considered in its own merit, so places may be offered on the basis of professional qualification and relevant experiences. Candidates with a lower degree classification or no degree may be admitted at Postgraduate Certificate or Diploma level, with an opportunity to upgrade to Master’s level if satisfactory progress is made.

Career Opportunities

Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) is a growing area of employment. The skills you learn on this course (e.g. lesson planning, presentation skills, classroom experience, research skills) are transferable to other languages and a wide range of professional situations.

Career destinations include language tutors in various private and public sector contexts, primary/secondary teachers and vocational/industrial trainers and instructors.

Additional Costs

Approximately £300 for literature

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