UWTSD lecturer shares tips for building physical exercise into busy lives


04.03.2021

Daniel Martin, a physiotherapist and lecturer on the University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s (UWTSD’s) Sport and Exercise Therapy degree programme has released a video giving his tips on how to fit physical activity into a busy lifestyle. The video has been published online by The Nursing Standard.

Daniel Martin, a physiotherapist and lecturer on the University of Wales Trinity Saint David’s (UWTSD’s) Sport and Exercise Therapy degree programme has released a video giving his tips on how to fit physical activity into a busy lifestyle.

Responding to the British Journal of Sports Medicine’s new guidelines that we should undertake 150-300 minutes of moderate to vigorous exercise per week, Daniel Martin’s video outlines how to make gains even if you currently fall far short of that target. He outlines how to progress with your exercise, gradually building up your efforts and incorporating exercise into your week. As the end of lockdown approaches, he hopes that these tips will help people build up good habits that they are able to sustain for the long term.

“If I had to summarise the message of the video, it would be stay active, do what you can and focus on small efforts. Stay engaged with others, try to monitor what you do with your watch or fitness trackers, and do activity you enjoy or makes that you feel better,” he says.

As well as being a lecturer on the Sport and Exercise Therapy degree programme, Daniel teaches on some of UWTSD’s other degree programmes, including its health portfolio. He is also a Chartered Physiotherapist with his own private practice, which keeps his skills up to date and sees him treating people all over the world via the internet.

His video for Nursing Standard comes at a time when many of us are struggling to feel fit and healthy.

“There are two main reasons for this topic being so important at the moment,” he says. “The second lockdown has come at a pretty awful time in relation to the weather, and these things combined mean that people are less likely to get out and do physical activity. 

“The other reason is that people are becoming even more sedentary as the number of us working online and at home increases dramatically. Physical activity is vital for people’s function and health and is one way in which we can target the silent pandemic of obesity.”

Daniel and his colleagues intend to continue collaborating with outlets such as the Nursing Standard in order to spread the message about the importance of physical activity.

For the students Daniel teaches, the restrictions of lockdown have been especially significant, as their studies are so focused around physical activity – but he says they have adapted well.

“The students have been fantastic throughout the past year,” he says. “They have been very patient when required and flexible in their approach to learning. They have been brilliant in adhering to protocols that stipulate full PPE and have embraced any tasks set before them.”

While lockdown has been tough for many, Daniel believes we can draw positives from the way in which it has highlighted the importance of physical activity.

“It has helped people to understand the importance of keeping fit and active,” he says. “The greater availability of activity options has also been a plus, thanks to options such as Fitness + on iOS devices and other companies coming into the field too. 

“Health is a lifelong task and any tools that we pick up in relation to improving health markers can be useful throughout our lives. Hopefully some of the tools picked up during the pandemic will be useful into the future.”

Further Information

Rebecca Davies

Swyddog Gweithredol Cysylltiadau â’r Wasg a’r Cyfryngau

Executive Press and Media Relations Officer

Cyfathrebu Corfforaethol a Chysylltiadau Cyhoeddus

Corporate Communications and PR

Mobile: 07384 467071

Email: Rebecca.Davies@uwtsd.ac.uk